Joshua Getzler - A History of Water Rights at Common Law

Table of Casesxxi
Table of Statutesxxxv
Regnal Yearsxxxvii
Abbreviationsxxxix
Introduction1(7)
The Significance of Riparian Doctrine
1(2)
The Economic Consequences of the Law
3(3)
Doctrinal and Empirical Case-studies
6(2)
1. The Exploitation of Water in Historical Perspective8(38)
Landscape and Industry
8(1)
Water Use in the Ancient World-The 'Hydraulic Society' Hypothesis
9(3)
Water for Power in the Ancient World
12(4)
A Technically Simple Society?
12(3)
Culturalist Explanations of Technological Stagnation
15(1)
Medieval Water Use and Power Technology
16(6)
Feudal Milling Monopolies
19(2)
Early Legislative Control of Water Use
21(1)
The Modern Age of Water Power
22(9)
The Arkwrights and the New Industrialism
25(2)
The Genesis of the Factory: Water Power and Monopoly
27(4)
Water Supply, Water Rights, and Industrial Location
31(6)
Other Uses of Water in the Industrial Age
37(2)
Legal Conflict over Water Rights
39(4)
The Doctrinal History of Water Rights
43(3)
2. Servitude Doctrine in Early Law46(71)
The Forms of Action
46(19)
Actions for Rights and Wrongs
47(2)
Romanism in Early English Property Actions
49(3)
Nuisance, Water Rights, and the Forms of Action
52(3)
Disseisin and Nuisance Forms of Action
55(1)
The Form of Action for Defence of Servitudes and User
56(2)
Bracton's Exposition of the Assize of Nuisance
58(3)
The Real Form of the Nuisance Action
58(1)
The Doctrine of Appurtenance
59(1)
Real and Personal Remedies
60(1)
Seisin and Title
61(1)
Bracton's Analysis of Injuria and Damnum
61(2)
The Forms of Action after Bracton
63(1)
The Rise of Trespass
64(1)
Bracton, Roman Law, and the Substantive Nature of Water Rights
65(11)
Ownership and Incorporeal Rights: Some Institutionalist Distinctions
65(2)
Common Ownership Contrasted with Res Communes Ideas
67(2)
Natural Water Rights as 'Servitudes Imposed by Law'
69(1)
Servitudes as Praedial Rights over Another's Property
70(1)
The Distinction Between Servitudes and Natural Rights, and the Unity of Remedy
70(2)
Roman Servitude Doctrine
72(3)
Servitudes as Proprietary Land-use Rights
72(1)
The Praedial Doctrine
72(2)
Servitudes Asserted by in Rem Actions
74(1)
Ius and Ius in Re Aliena
74(1)
Bracton's Adoption of Specific Roman Water Doctrines
75(1)
The Natural Source Doctrine
76(1)
Standards of Reasonableness in the Exercise of Rights
76(21)
Reasonable Extensions of Right
76(1)
Reasonable Restraints of Right
77(2)
Constitution of Rights of Grant by Livery and Use
79(2)
Rules for the Constitution of Incorporeal Rights
81(3)
Prescription
84(2)
Roman Prescription Precedents
84(1)
Usucapio
85(1)
Extinctive Prescription
86(1)
Bracton's Doctrine of Prescription for Servitudes
86(2)
Modern Analysis of Bractonian Prescription
88(9)
F.W. Maitland
88(4)
J.W. Salmond
92(5)
The Later Medieval Law: From Bracton to Coke
97(20)
The Exclusion of Romanism from Legal Reasoning
97(3)
The Rise of the Action on the Case for Nuisance
100(1)
Trespass to Land and Trespass on the Case for Nuisance
101(6)
Public or Common Nuisance and the Action on the Case
107(2)
Water as Public Property Defended by Mixed Nuisance Actions
109(2)
Dominance of Action on the Case for Nuisance
111(2)
The Nature of Water Incidents-A Confusion of Theories
113(1)
Injury and Damage
114(3)
3. The Common Law of Riparian Rights 1580-1750117(36)
Ancient Use
117(5)
The Use of the Maxim Sic Utere Tuo ut Alienum non Laedas to Explain Natural Rights
122(5)
Protection of Immemorial Flow
127(2)
The Triumph of Natural-Right Analysis
129(11)
Pleading and Substance in the Late Seventeenth Century
140(6)
The Nature of the Interest
140(2)
Maximalist Pleadings
140(1)
Minimalist Pleadings
141(1)
The Extent of Protection-Damage or Title?
142(4)
The Theory of Injuria Sine Damno
146(2)
Direct and Indirect Causation: New Conceptualizations of Trespass and Case
148(5)
4. Blackstone's and Hale's Doctrines of Land and Water Use153(40)
Institutionalists and the Development of the Modern Law
153(1)
The Theory of Water Rights in Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England
154(1)
Natural Law, Positivism, and Property Theory
155(3)
The Relationship of Common Law and Custom
156(1)
Custom and Time Immemorial
157(1)
Absolute and Relative Property and Social Contract Theory
158(2)
Property as an Absolute Personal Right or Natural Right
159(1)
The Natural Basis of Property Titles in Use and Occupation
160(3)
The Distinction between Use and Title
160(1)
Occupation as the Natural Source of Title
160(3)
Explaining the Creation and Vesting of Titles
163(1)
The Taxonomy of Title Rights
164(1)
Incorporeal Hereditaments
165(4)
Definition of Incorporeal Property
166(1)
The Nature of Incorporeal Rights-Advowsons
166(1)
Rights of Common
167(2)
Ways
169(1)
Prior Appropriation, Competition, and Monopoly The Case of Franchises
169(3)
'Transient' Property and Title by Prior Appropriation-The Case of Water
172(5)
Water as Personal Property with Real Qualities
174(1)
Water as 'Qualified Property'
175(2)
Hale's De Jure Maris
177(3)
'Concerning the Interest of Fresh Rivers'-Ownership of Soil of Streams
178(1)
'Of the Right of Prerogative in Private of Fresh Rivers'-Royal Franchises and Supervision
179(1)
'Concerning Publick Streams'-Public Law Rights in Rivers as Highways
179(1)
The Doctrine of Dedication of Private Goods to Public Use
180(1)
Blackstone's Analysis of Remedial Law
180(13)
Tort Remedies for Possession and Property
181(1)
The Complexity of Remedy-based Common Law
181(1)
Romanizing the Forms of Action
182(1)
Injuries to Real Rights: Disseisin
182(1)
Injuries to Property Enjoyment: Trespass
183(1)
Injuries to Property Enjoyment: Nuisance
184(10)
Nuisance to Corporeal Hereditaments
185(3)
Protection of Incorporeal Rights of Grant from Nuisance
188(1)
The Forms of Action for Nuisance
189(2)
Self-help to Abate the Nuisance
191(2)
5. Appropriation Theory in the Courts193(75)
Natural Right and Prescription Ideas in the Courts at the Time of Blackstone
193(1)
The Modern Doctrine of Prescription and Presumed Grant
194(7)
Prescription for Incorporeal Property and 1189
194(1)
Reasonableness and Necessity in Presumptions of Grant
195(1)
Reasonableness and the Status of the Presumed Grant
196(1)
The Fiction of the Lost Modern Grant
197(4)
The Policy of Prescription Doctrine
201(1)
Brown v. Best
201(3)
Blackstonian Prior Appropriation Theory in the Courts
204(18)
Kames' Riposte Romanist Natural Rights
204(3)
English Appropriation Doctrine c.1800
207(1)
Bealey v. Shaw and the Adoption of Prior Appropriation Theory
207(6)
Applications of the Blackstonian Doctrine
213(4)
Equity Leads the Law
217(3)
Blackstonian Appropriation Theory Revived in the Court of King's Bench
220(2)
The Generalization of Appropriation Theory
222(4)
Reform of the Prior Appropriation Theory-Mason v. Hill
226(6)
Rights in Artificial Watercourses
232(27)
Arkwright v. Gell
232(6)
Magor v. Chadwick
238(3)
Wood v. Waud
241(2)
Artificial Conduits and Artificially Obtained Water
243(2)
Local Custom and Rights in Artificial Channels
245(7)
Non-riparian Statutory Rights to Water: The Canal and Utility Cases
252(6)
Refining the Factual Presumption of Prescriptive Title
258(1)
Liability for Escapes and Sic Utere Tuo before the Rule of Rylands v. Fletcher
259(9)
Fault Liability for Flooding
260(1)
Subterranean Watercourses and the Plenitude of Ownership
261(7)
6. The Establishment of the Modern Riparian Doctrine268(60)
The Influence of Civilian and American Riparian Doctrine in the Nineteenth Century
268(14)
Roman Doctrine and the Rise of Treatise Literature
268(2)
Romanism in the Modern Courts
270(1)
American Civilianism and Riparian Law
271(3)
Tyler v. Wilkinson and the Story Doctrine
274(2)
A Closer Look at Sic Utere Tuo
276(3)
After Tyler v. Wilkinson
279(3)
The Role of Gale's Law of Easements
282(1)
A Doctrinal Terminus
282(14)
Embrey v. Owen: The Arguments
283(4)
Embrey v. Owen: The Decision
287(3)
Acceptance and Elaboration of the Embrey Doctrine
290(2)
Affirmation by the House of Lords: Miner v. Gilmour
292(2)
The Embrey Test and Jury Directions
294(2)
Completing the Structure of Water Law: Subterranean Waters; Indefinite Surface Waters; and Assignability
296(20)
Rights in Underground Watercourses-Theorizing in the Court of Exchequer
296(4)
Rights in Indefinite Surface Waters
300(2)
Chasemore v. Richards: Indefinite Waters and Assignability
302(13)
Bradford Corporation v. Pickles: Motive and the Exercise of Property Rights
315(1)
Assignability of Water Rights and the Appurtenancy Rule
316(12)
Bramwell's Commodification Experiment Rejected
320(4)
Physical Interference with River Channels
324(1)
Lord Blackburn and the Scots Theory of Riparianism
325(3)
Conclusion328(25)
Internal and External Interpretation of the Law
328(1)
Harnessing Possession and Usufruct
329(2)
The Economic Ideology Account
331(5)
The Transaction Costs Account
336(7)
Evidence and Doctrine: 'Fact' Becomes 'Law'
343(3)
Institutional Design and the 'Tragedy of the Commons'
346(4)
Public Power and Private Rights
350(3)
Bibliography353(38)
Index391



Joshua Getzler boeken - A History of Water Rights at Common Law
ISBN 9780198265818
PAGINA’S 390
DRUK 1e druk
UITVOERING Harde kaft
TAAL Engels
UITGEVER Oxford Univ Pr on Demand

TIJDELIJK UITVERKOCHT

Dit boek is tijdelijk uitverkocht. Vul uw e-mail adres in om bericht te krijgen zodra het boek leverbaar is.

E-mail adres:


176,95

De genoemde prijs is een indicatie.